TV & radio: what to tune in to next week (23-29 September 2017)

Can't decide which shows to watch or listen to next week? Here are 10 programmes you won't want to miss...

Britain’s Lost Masterpieces. (Image Credit: BBC/Tern Television/Laura Radford)
Britain’s Lost Masterpieces. (Image Credit: BBC/Tern Television/Laura Radford)
 
 
Britain’s Ancient Tracks With Tony Robinson 
Channel 4
Saturday 23 September, 7.00pm
 
The presenter hits the trackways of Britain for a second series of rambles, beginning with a trek across Dartmoor in the footsteps of Sherlock Holmes. There’s more tramping in WWII’s Great Escape: The Freedom Trails (Channel 4, 8.00pm), in which Monty Halls follows in the footsteps of Len Harley, an escapee from Nazi-occupied Italy.
 
 
 
The Forum: Julius Caesar 
BBC World Service
Tuesday 26 September, 8.05pm
 
The discussion series presented by Bridget Kendall turns its attention to the rise and fall of the Roman politician and general, and the way he shook up the Roman Republic. With a similar format, this week’s In Our Time (Radio 4, Thursday 28 September, 9.00am) finds Melvyn Bragg and co discussing Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights.
 
 
 
When Greeks Flew Kites 
Radio 4
Sunday 24 September, 1.30pm
 
The September edition of the history series finds Sarah Dunant again taking a contemporary anxiety as a starting point for a journey into the past. Her theme this month is debt. Expect discussion of the state control of debt and the personal cost of being an indentured servant in British Guyana in the 19th century.
 
 
Victoria. (ITV Pictures)
 
 
Egypt’s Great Pyramid: The New Evidence 
Channel 4
Sunday 24 September, 8.00pm
 
Just how did the ancient Egyptians go about building vast pyramids? This documentary focuses on a relic of the pharaoh Khufu, a solar boat, discovered at the base of Egypt’s Great Pyramid, which archaeologists think may point to a key role for ships and water during construction. 
 
 
 
Victoria 
ITV 
Sunday 24 September, 9.00pm
 
Episode five of eight and Victoria (Jenna Coleman) fancies a jolly. So off she toddles to France for a parley with King Louis Philippe. Sir Robert Peel disapproves of this dalliance with foreign affairs. Meantime, Albert (Tom Hughes) is moping. Again. 
 
 
 
Listen To Britain 2017 
BBC Four
Sunday 24 September, 9.00pm
 
Humphrey Jennings’ hugely influential Listen To Britain, made in 1942, featured evocative montages of life on the home front. Kevin MacDonald introduces a screening of the film, along with 12 short features detailing life in contemporary Britain and commissioned to mark the documentary’s 75th anniversary.
 
 
 

Pick of the week

The Vietnam War 
BBC Four 
Monday 25 September, 9.00pm & 9.55pm
 
A decade in production, this 10-part history of the Vietnam conflict from Ken Burns and Lynn Novick aspires to the epic – and doesn’t disappoint. The first two episodes, covering the years 1858-1963, explore the colonial era and its immediate aftermath, and the way JFK’s administration grappled with the question of how deeply to get involved in South Vietnam.
 
 
 
 
Britain’s Lost Masterpieces 
BBC Four 
Wednesday 27 September, 9.00pm
 
Art specialist Dr Bendor Grosvenor and social historian Emma Dabiri present a second series of the show that explores overlooked paintings in the public art collection. First up, the duo consider the provenance of a portrait of George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham. Was it painted by one of the most famous artists in history? 
 
 
 
Russia With Simon Reeve
BBC Two 
Thursday 28 September, 9.00pm
 
As part of a season marking the centenary of the October revolution, intrepid journalist Reeve journeys across Russia. In the first of three travelogues, he visits icy Kamchatka in the east. The cops in Vladivostok, it turns out, don’t much like western film crews. 
 
 
Russia With Simon Reeve. (Image Credit: BBC/Craig Hastings)
 
 
The Hidden History Of The Corridor 
Radio 4
Friday 29 September, 11.00am
 
Corridors are places we tramp through to get from one place to another. What could possibly be interesting about them? Step forward Rachel Hurdley, sociologist and historian, who walks us through the corridor as a place where geopolitics, class, sex and secrecy meet. 
 
 
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